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INTRODUCING THE GEOENGINEERING ACT OF 2019

by Wendy Fachon  https://netwalkri.com/

Have you ever noticed strange cloud patterns in the sky? Many people see this as evidence of intentional weather modification created by cloud seeding, a process by which airplane emissions inject unnatural particulates into the atmosphere. And, many people are alarmed about how this may adversely effect the quality of their air, water, soil, health and future of their children.

At a meeting of Rhode Island’s Special Commission to Study Intentional Manipulation of the Global Environment Through Geoengineering, a member of the commission, Rachael McIntosh, shared a story: “My sister and I spent a lot of time at TF Green Airport waiting around in that big green hanger on Airport Road while dad did up his flight plan after checking in with the weather station. Little did I realize that years later my life would be focused on the weather, specifically with something called geoengineering.”

What is geoengineering? McIntosh explained, “Geoengineering is ‘the intentional manipulation of the environment, involving nuclear, biological, chemical, electromagnetic, and/or other physical-agent activities that effect changes to Earth’s atmosphere and/or surface. There are many types of Geoengineering. For instance, if you build a dam and create a lake, that’s geoengineering! If you inject Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) as dry ice, into the atmosphere to create rain, that’s geoengineering too! You’ve seen the results in the sky. The sky looks different than it did 20 years ago. It’s a lot more murky and polluted looking. New, man-made cloud types now exist and are being taught to kids in school.”

McIntosh has compiled an impressive amount of research on the history of this science. Her documentation outlines a comprehensive time line of weather control and reveals intense efforts to militarize the power of being able to control natural phenomena. She introduced her research by stating, “Rhode Island’s Senator Claiborne Pell, pictured on that first binder, was the first elected official to recognize the dangers of geoengineering. In 1975 he wrote an Editorial in The Providence Journal called, ‘United States and Other World Powers Should Outlaw Tampering With Weather for Use as a War Weapon.’ He was afraid that world leaders would, ‘start directing storms, manipulating climates, and inducing earthquakes against their enemies.”

Senator Pell knew of Operation Popeye, a highly classified weather modification program that was used in Vietnam to extend the monsoon season. Modified rain poured down upon the Ho Chi Minh Trail, extending the rainy season over the main military supply route for the Viet Cong.

Most people would like to put their heads in the sand and ignore geoengineering. Others want to learn more. If the chemical agents being used in atmospheric geoengineering are showering down from above, how toxic are they? What can one person do to change this situation? McIntosh pushed to create a special commission to study and provide recommendations for state regulation and licensure of all geoengineering technologies. The result is H5992, The Geoengineering Act of 2019, which describes the implementation and enforcement of a regulation process to insure that emissions of any sort resulting from geoengineering, proposed or already in use, are safe for people and the environment.

McIntosh explained the need for the law: “No one is breaking any laws in Rhode Island as all this weather modification/geoingineering stuff swirls around us, and that’s because WE HAVE NO LAW governing Geoengineering. We are allowing these xenobiotic, neurotoxic, carcinogenic agents to be showered upon us willy-nilly with no legal recourse as our people and our environment are becoming more and more fragile due to ongoing exposure.”

The result of the commission study was the drafting of the Geoengineering Act of 2019 model legislation, which can be found online – webserver.rilin.state.ri.us/BillText/BillText19/HouseText19/H5992.pdf

Mark Jacobson, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University says in a letter of support for The Rhode Island Geoengineering Act, that he “strongly supports the goals of analyzing and regulating any proposed geoengineering activity before it is put in place in the atmosphere or oceans because of the strong unintended consequences of such activities and the fact that they do not solve atmospheric problems, merely mask them for future generations to deal with while

the underling problems worsen.’”

McIntosh puts the state legislative effort into perspective: “The federal government and transnational organizations have not, and will not do it for us. Currently the State of Rhode Island requires a license to cut fingernails. Geoengineering is a far greater public safety threat but is completely unregulated. State legislation is essential because international groups are scrambling to impose geoengineering governance upon us without our consent. Either we impose regulatory prohibition of Geoengineering within a legal framework here in Rhode Island, or we lose the ability to have any input or oversight over these hazardous activities, and unelected global agencies will govern geoengineering for us… The people of Rhode Island are NOT subjects! We have the absolute right and authority to govern ourselves.”

How can people take action? They can read the proposed legislation online at webserver.rilin.state.ri.us/BillText/BillText19/HouseText19/H5992.pdf and share it with friends. They can get involved in the public hearing scheduled for Thursday, May 2 in Room 101 at the Rhode Island State House. After 4:30pm the House Committee on Environment and Natural Resources convenes, and The Geoengineering Act is on the agenda. Testimony is welcomed and is best limited to two minutes or one page. People should also keep in mind that Committee Chairman Bennett requests that any witnesses bringing written testimony provide 23 copies for committee use. For people unable to attend, written testimony, marked with bill number H5992, can be sent to the committee clerk, Louis Mansolillo at lmansolillo@rilegislature.gov.

Beyond this, Rhode Islanders can contact local representatives and senators to share opinions, personal stories, rain water testing results, medical test results. Citizens in other states can share this model legislation and propose it to their own state representatives. What one person can do, many people can do. That is what will.

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